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Case Western Reserve University

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Tuesday February 22nd, 2011

The Selma-Montgomery Voting Rights March

Moderator

Jonathan Entin, Professor of Law and Political Science, Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Speakers

Diane Phillips-Leatherberry, a long-time civil rights activist in Cleveland

Daniel Clancy, a long-time law school and university administrator at Case Western Reserve University who was an FBI agent assigned to Selma at the time

Wednesday March 2, 2011, 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Sponored by the Case Western Reserve University School of Law

The Selma-Montgomery Voting Rights March was a landmark of the civil rights movement and a pivotal step in the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This program provides the perspectives of two people who were there: Diane Phillips-Leatherberry, a long-time civil rights activist in Cleveland who marched, and Daniel Clancy, a long-time law school and university administrator who was an FBI agent assigned to Selma at the time. The moderator, Professor Jonathan Entin of Case Western Reserve University School of Law, has taught and written extensively about civil rights and constitutional issues.

Additional Information About Our Guest

Jonathan Entin has taught Constitutional Law, Administrative Law, Courts, Public Policy, and Social Change, and a Supreme Court Seminar. Before joining the faculty in 1984, he clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (when she was on the U.S. court of Appeals) and practiced in Washington with Steptoe & Johnson. The recipient of several teaching awards and a former co-editor of the Journal of Legal Education, he is at work on a book about equal protection. Among his recent publications are “An Ohio Dilemma: Race, Equal Protection, and the Unfulfilled Promise of a State Bill of Rights,” Cleveland State Law Review (2004), and “Judicial Selection and Political Culture,” Capital University Law Review (2002).

A Cleveland native, Daniel Clancy, a graduate of St. Edward High School in Lakewood, received his undergraduate degree from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. Following his graduation from Western Reserve University’s law school, Clancy served as a special agent for the FBI from 1962-1965. Included in his assignments was the march of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and civil rights activists from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., in the spring of 1965.

Clancy also served as an associate dean at the School of Law, where he had numerous interactions with law student Michael Magness, who is the current president of the Alumni Association of Case Western Reserve University. Clancy most recently served as special assistant to the vice president for university relations.

Clancy and his wife, Carol, have five children and eight grandchildren.